Black History Month
 AfricanAmericanHistoryOnline.com Black History 

 

Articles

•  Home
•  Black History in the News
•  A Troubled Time
•  Affirmative Action
•  Andrew Jackson Beard
•  Barack Obama
•  Bass Reeves
•  Bessie Coleman
•  Black Power
•  Booker T. Washington
•  Brown vs. Board of Education
•  Buffalo Soldiers
•  Cab Calloway
•  Cathay Williams
•  Earl Lloyd
•  Emanuel Stance
•  Equal Opportunity Legislation
Eugene Jacques Bullard
Frederick Douglass
•  George Washington Carver
•  Granville T. Woods
•  Harriet Tubman
•  Jackie Robinson
•  Jarm Logue
•  Jermain Wesley Loguen
•  John Mercer Langston
•  Jordan & Ali
•  Juneteenth
•  Laughter That Heals
•  Leron Lee
•  Malcolm X
•  Marcus Garvey
•  Marian Wright Edelman
•  Martin Luther King Jr.
•  Martin Luther King Jr.'s Dream
•  Mary Elizabeth Mahoney
•  Memorial Day
•  Nat Turner
•  Negro League Baseball Museum
•  Rosa Parks
•  Sam Cooke
•  Sarah E. Goode
•  Slavery
•  Dr Solomon Carter
•  The Dred Scott Decision
•  The 13th Amendment
•  The 15th Amendment
•  The Halls of Power
•  The Harlem Renaissance
•  The Black American Soldier
•  The Rainbow Coalition
•  The Underground Railroad
•  Thurgood Marshall
•  Tousant L'Overture
•  Triumph at Berlin Olympics
•  Vivien T. Thomas
•  W.E.B. Du Bois
•  William Still


Shop
•  African American History Online Black History Store
•  100 African-Americans Who Shaped American History
•  1001 Things Everyone Should Know About African American History
•  African American Culture DVD Series
•  African American Firsts
•  Black History: From Civil War Through Today
•  Black History of the White House
•  Black Men Built the Capitol
•  Black Pioneers of Science and Invention
•  Creating Black Americans
•  Kid's Guide to African American History
•  Legacy: Treasures of Black History
•  Setting the Record Straight
•  more...







Cab Calloway
Cab CallowayCab Calloway 2

Cabell "Cab" Calloway III (December 25, 1907 – November 18, 1994) was a jazz singer and bandleader. He was strongly associated with the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, where he was a regular performer.

Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States' most popular big bands from the start of the 1930s through to the late 1940s. Calloway's band featured performers including trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, saxophonists Ben Webster and Leon "Chu" Berry, New Orleans guitar ace Danny Barker, and bassist Milt Hinton. Calloway continued to perform until his death in 1994 at the age of 86.

Profile

Cab Calloway -- the legendary "Hi De Ho" man -- was a energetic showman, gifted singer, talented actor and trendsetting fashion plate. A truly "larger than life" figure in American pop culture, immortalized in cartoons and caricatures, Calloway also led one of the greatest bands of the Swing Era.


In 1930, he was hired to replace Duke Ellington at the exclusive Cotton Club in Harlem. His most famous song, Minnie the Moocher, was written in 1931 and sold over 1,000,000 copies. He was also known for the tunes Are You Hip To That Jive and Hi-De-Ho Man. His career including singing, songwriting, band leader and actor.

The band broke up in the 1940's when bad financial decisions (gambling problems) caught up with Cab. He would go on to appear on Broadway including an all-black Hello Dolly. In 1980, a new generation was introduced to 73-year-old Cab by way of the film The Blues Brothers.

 



In the 1950s Calloway moved his family from Long Island, New York in order to raise the three youngest of his five daughters in Greenburgh, New York. In his later career Calloway appeared in a number of films and stage productions that used both his acting and singing talents. In 1952 he played the prominent role of "Sportin' Life" in a production of the Gershwin opera, Porgy and Bess, with William Warfield and Leontyne Price as the title characters. Another notable role was "Yeller" in The Cincinnati Kid (1965), with Steve McQueen, Ann-Margret, and Edward G. Robinson.

Calloway appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on March 19, 1967 with Chris Calloway. In 1967, Calloway co-starred opposite Pearl Bailey as Horace Vandergelder in an all-black cast change of Hello, Dolly! on Broadway during its original run. It revived the flagging business for the show and RCA released a new cast recording, rare for the time. In 1973–1974, Calloway was featured in an unsuccessful Broadway revival of The Pajama Game alongside Hal Linden and Barbara McNair.

1976 saw the release of his autobiography, Of Minnie the Moocher and Me (Crowell). It included his complete Hepsters Dictionary as an appendix.

Calloway attracted renewed interest in 1980 when he appeared as a supporting character in the film The Blues Brothers, performing "Minnie the Moocher", and again when he sang "The Jumpin' Jive" with the Two-Headed Monster on Sesame Street. This also was the year the cult movie Forbidden Zone was released, which included rearrangements of, and homages to, Calloway songs written by Calloway fan Danny Elfman, performed by Elfman and his band, The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo.



Share |




Black History in the News | Privacy Policy

Black History Store © 2010-2017 AfricanAmericanHistoryOnline.com | Black History Store

Created by sliplink.net


Share |